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Be careful as mobile apps are using your card details, passwords, username via screenshots

According to a new study, the researchers have found that some of the smartphones companies are secretly taking the screenshots of all your activities including some personal informations like credit and debit card details, passwords, username and others crucial information and pass it on to the third party.

David Choffnes, a professor at the North eastern University, US said, “We found that thousands of popular apps have the ability to record your screenshot and anything you type”.

He added further, “That includes your username and password, because it can record the characters you type before they turn into those little black dots”.

The study came out as a result to investigate whether smartphones are getting through your conversations and then selling those information to the companies for the targeted advertisements.

However, the researchers found no evidence against the recorded conversation but discovered something more dangerous.

Choffness said, “We knew we were looking for a needle in a haystack, and we surprised to find several needles and this opening will almost certainly be used for malicious purpose”.

As it is simple to install and collect the information of the user but the most disturbing factor is that all informations are retrieved without any notifications or to permission of the user.

The study is done on the 17,000 popular apps on the Android operating system among which 9,000 apps have the capability to take the screenshots or send the video of the activities to the third party.

That app was found to be GoPuff which is a fast-food delivery service and they are passing on the information to Appsee which is data analytics firm for the mobile phones without any concerned information to the app users.

The main motive of retrieving information may be is to debug their apps and improve the user experience which will not be counted as a malicious activity.

Choffnes concluded, “That has the potential to be much worse than having the camera taking pictures of the ceiling or the microphone recording pointless conversation. There is no easy way to close this privacy opening”.

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